1 May 2020 to 30 May 2020
Stephan Goldrajch (BE)

In these delicate times when it is necessary to be attentive to ourselves and to others, we would like to invite several artists to propose an artistic action/reflection starting from our common situation of confinement and its consequences on the notion of public space.

Stephan Goldrajch is a visual artist from Bruxelles. He works with textile materials from which he creates masks, embroidery, installations, drawings, legends, performances... His approach is based on the imperative of social ties.

A lost sense

As a response to our proposal, Stephan Goldrajch wanted to meet and question deaf people about communication difficulties they encounter in this new world where everybody wears a mask.

To do so, he first created a knitted and crocheted mask that he called "A lost sense".

This mask was then drawn and passed on to many deaf people, including several specialized institutions. The IRSA (Royal Institute for Deafs and Blinds) commissioned a fresco of it that Stephan created in the schoolyard, it was then coloured by the students.

The fruit of the many encounters made possible by this project will be expressed in the public space in a new stage of work.

 

Confined Public Space

CIFAS has been interested by artists working in public space for 10 years, thus investing the city as an open space for reflection and action, organising workshops, debates and artistic interventions.

In this public space, the role of the artist is complex and varied: disrupting our aesthetic habits, developing tools for social cohesion, contributing to urban renewal projects, etc... The artistic strategies to be deployed in the public space meet necessities and constraints that are very different from the spaces usually reserved for art (theatre or exhibition spaces).

Today, however, with the COVID-19 crisis, public space is suffering: it is no longer possible to move around, cross each other, or get together. A social shock that we all experience, confined to our private spheres. So how do we make art at a time when everyone fears for their health and that of their loved ones and wonders when and how it will be possible to return to urban life? Is there an art of confinement? What artistic strategies should be deployed in order to create in this context? What has become of public space today?

In these delicate times when it is necessary to be attentive to ourselves and to others, we would like to invite several artists to propose an artistic action/reflection starting from our common situation of confinement and its consequences on the notion of public space.